Outcomes Data: Creative Writing

2021-22   2020-21   2019-20   2018-19    2017-18   2016-17  2015-16   2014-15   2013-14   2012-13   2011-12   2010-11

2021-22 Outcomes Data 

PART 1 of 2: DIRECT MEASURES

Common Learning Objectives

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions (writing for an audience

 

 

5

13

Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

 

 

8

10

Learning Objective 3: Communicates ideas effectively in writing

 

 

4

14

 

PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Questionnaires)

Each year creative writing assesses the curriculum through indirect measures as well. These indirect measures are comprised of anonymous and open-ended questionnaires completed by students enrolled in the advanced classes in the Spring semester of the year. Continuing fall out from the pandemic affected the number of students who completed surveys in the spring of 2022. Of those surveyed,  the following concerns were raised by students:

  • More exposure to experimental forms
  • More diversity in authors explored and respected

2020-21 Outcomes Data

DIRECT MEASURES  (9 Portfolios Evaluated by two Faculty).

Common Learning Objectives

 

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions (writing for an audience

 

 

4

14

Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

 

 

4

14

Learning Objective 3: Communicates ideas effectively in writing

 

 

5

13

 

PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Questionnaires and Exit Interviews)

Anonymous and open-ended questionnaires completed by students enrolled in the advanced classes in the Spring of 2019 revealed that:

  1. Students enthusiastically support using class fees to bring in visiting writers.
  2. Students overwhelming appreciate the grammar course being a required course.
  3. A majority of students prefer f2f learning; however, some actually prefer learning over Zoom. All appreciate the efforts of faculty.

2019-20 Outcomes Data

PART 1 of 2: DIRECT MEASURES (Rubric of Student Work)

Common Learning Objectives in Creative Writing

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions 0 1 5 12
Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

0 1 7 10
Learning Objective 3: Communicate ideas effectively through competence in form 0 1 6 11

PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Questionaires and Exit Interviews) 
Each year creative writing assesses the curriculum through indirect measures as well. These indirect measures are comprised of anonymous and open-ended questionnaires completed by students enrolled in the advanced classes in the Spring semester of the year. Because the global pandemic caused face-to-face courses to move online in March of 2020, creative writing was unable to collect questionnaires. Therefore, creative writing will make no decisions based on indirect measures this year. It is possible that this will be true for Spring 2021 as well.

2018-19 Outcomes Data

PART 1 of 2: DIRECT MEASURES (Rubric of Student Work)

Common Learning Objectives in Creative Writing

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions 0 0 5 13
Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

0 0 2 16
Learning Objective 3: Communicate ideas effectively through competence in form 0 1 9 9

PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Questionaires and Exit Interviews) 

Anonymous and open-ended questionnaires completed by students enrolled in the advanced classes in the Spring of 2019 revealed that:

  • Students would like shorter class periods or more classes being offered at different times and on different days. Some would like a seminar-like course.
  • Students would like more variety in the creative writing offerings and more creative writing faculty.
  • Students would like a required grammar class.
  • Students would like more peer editing outside of class.

2017-18 Outcomes Data

PART 1 of 2: DIRECT MEASURES (Rubric of Student Work)

Common Learning Objectives in Creative Writing

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions 0 0 8 10
Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

0 0 7 11
Learning Objective 3: Communicate ideas effectively through competence in form 0 1 7 10

PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Questionaires and Exit Interviews) 

Anonymous and open-ended questionnaires completed by students enrolled in the advanced classes in the Spring of 2018 revealed that:

  • Students would like classes focused on genre fiction as well as novel writing.
  • Students would like classes on publishing, editing, and finding a job.
  • Students would like to read more contemporary literature in both their literary studies classes and creative writing classes.

2016-17 Outcomes Data

PART 1 of 2: DIRECT MEASURES (Rubric of Student Work) 

Common Learning Objectives in Creative Writing

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions 0 0 4 14
Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

0 0 3 15
Learning Objective 3: Communicate ideas effectively through competence in form 0 0 7 11

PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Questionaires and Exit Interviews) 

Anonymous and open-ended questionnaires completed by students as well as exit interviews conducted with seniors in the Spring of 2017 revealed that:

  • Students would like more visiting writers.
  • Students would like a wider variety of classes that move beyond the workshop model and focus on “reading like a writer.”
  • Students would like more focus on grammar, technical skills, and practical skills for the marketplace.

2015-16 Outcomes Data

PART 1 of 2: DIRECT MEASURES (Rubric of Student Work)

Common Learning Objectives in Creative Writing

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions 0 0 3 27
Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

0 0 9 21
Learning Objective 3: Communicate ideas effectively through competence in form 0 0 8 22


PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Questionaires)
Anonymous and open-ended questionnaires completed by students revealed:

  • Students would like a greater variety of courses, specifically novel writing, genre-writing, contemporary literature, capstone, and publication classes.
  • Students are asking for more information about publishing, internships, and job opportunities.
  • Students ask for smaller class sizes and more one-on-one time with professors.

2014-15 Outcomes Data

PART 1 of 2: DIRECT MEASURES (Rubric of Student Work)

Common Learning Objectives in Creative Writing

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions 0 0 5 13
Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

0 0 7 11
Learning Objective 3: Communicate ideas effectively through competence in form 0 0 2 16

PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Interviews)

Exit interviews with students revealed:

  • Students routinely ask for a novel writing or play writing course.
  • Students routinely ask for a contemporary literature course.
  • Students are asking for more information about publishing.
  • In general, students ask for more courses in creative writing.

2013-14 Outcomes Data

PART 1 of 2: DIRECT MEASURES (Rubric of Student Work)

Common Learning Objectives in Creative Writing

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions 0 0 5 13
Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

0 0 7 11
Learning Objective 3: Communicate ideas effectively through competence in form 0 0 2 16

PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Interviews)

Exit interviews with students revealed:

  • Students noted the high quality of teachers, in particular their passion, knowledge, and accessibility.
  • Students consistently highlighted extracurricular activities as real strengths. These included Helicon West, the Bull Pen, and visiting writers.
  • Students liked the workshop format of the creative writing classes, as well as the relatively small size of the classes.
  • Students found strong connections between their literature classes and their writing classes, and praised McCuskey for his classes on genre fiction.
  • Students noted the feeling of community and the strength of the writing community both inside the classroom and outside it.

From this data, the committee noted the following concerns and made the following recommendations:

  • Several studentsrequestedsmallerclasses,notingthattheywerenotableto havetheir work workshopped as often or in as much detail as they would have liked.
  • Several students mentioned an ideal class size would be 12 to 15 students. Coincidentally, this size matches the AWP recommendations for undergraduate class sizes.
  • Students asked for more creative writing faculty so that they can have a greater variety of approaches to the genres and so that more workshops can be offered.
  • Students asked for more readings on campus by visiting writers. 

2012-13 Outcomes Data

No data available for 2012-13

2011-12 Outcomes Data

PART 1 of 2: DIRECT MEASURES (Rubric of Student Work)

Common Learning Objectives in Creative Writing

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions

0 0 5 13
Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

0 0 7 11
Learning Objective 3: Communicate ideas effectively through competence in form 0 0 2 16

PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Interviews)

Students consistently named the writing workshops as the most important aspect to their learning. We operate on the Iowa workshop model, and our writing classes devote the majority of class time to workshopping essays, stories and poems. Students saw this time as well spent and named it as highly important to their success. Students consistently named the visiting writers, Helicon West, Scribendi, and the Bull Pen as key facets to their learning. Students consistently named the faculty as exceptional, pointing to their knowledge of the subject and their passion. Students liked the requirement to take all genres, even though they didn’t think they would. They liked being forced to write in ways that stretched them. Students liked the kind and number of literature courses that they were required to take. Students consistently mentioned the poor quality of the building as a factor that impeded their learning.

Students suggested some kind of opening social or event where older students could inform newer students about important opportunities that lead to success. Students wanted courses in genre fiction and more specialized courses within genres (a course just on memoir, for example, or one just on novels) Students wanted to see increased interrelation between the intro and advanced courses within each genre. In the past, students have had trouble getting into advanced courses, but many mentioned the changes Susie has made in terms of advising to be beneficial and think those problems might no longer be the case. Students mentioned that nonemphasis students in the intro classes bring the overall quality of the class down.

2010-11 Outcomes Data

PART 1 of 2: DIRECT MEASURES (Rubric of Student Work)

Common Learning Objectives in Creative Writing

Unacceptable:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is not provided, is unconvincing, or very incomplete

Marginal:

Evidence that the student has mastered this objective is provided, but it is weak or incomplete

Acceptable:

Evidence shows that the student has generally attained the objective

Exceptional:

Evidence demonstrates that the student has mastered this objective at a high level

Learning Objective 1: Identify and artfully explain significant questions 0 0 5 13
Learning Objective 2: Gather and analyze relevant information in writing

0 0 7 11
Learning Objective 3: Communicate ideas effectively through competence in form 0 0 2 16

PART 2 of 2: INDIRECT MEASURES (Student Interviews)

Exit interviews with students revealed:

  • Students routinely ask for a novel writing or play writing course.
  • Students routinely ask for a contemporary literature course.
  • Students are asking for more information about publishing.
  • In general, students ask for more courses in creative writing.